SDA PRESENTS

StopDiscriminAsian (SDA) is proud to present a series of newly commissioned video works by three artists of AAPI-descent that respond to the upcoming general election: Jesse Chun, WangShui and Asif Mian.  Each Monday beginning Sept 28, a new work will debut accompanied by a brief interview with the artist. SDA asked the artists to address the rise of anti-Asian racism in the age of Trump, as well as the issues they felt were particularly urgent heading into this incredibly consequential election. Immigration, LGBTQ rights, and racial discrimination are just some of the concerns these artists chose to reflect on. These short moving-image works adopt the length of a traditional TV commercial, using the tools of mass-media circulation that profoundly impact political thought and engagement.

As the fastest-growing demographic of eligible voters compared to all other major races and ethnicities, Asian Americans have a major role to play in this nation’s political future.  While traditionally marked by low turnout, AAPI voters have made significant gains in recent years, jumping from 28% in 2014 to 42% in 2018. This leap in voter participation presents an opportunity for Asian Americans to engage more deeply in the political process, and to mobilize our communities towards generational change. We hope the individualized responses presented in these videos can bridge the disparate identities that make up the AAPI population by speaking to common concerns that impact all of us, while at the same time maintaining the distinctness of our many voices.  We also recognize that these critical issues demand commitments to action beyond November’s elections, and require mass movements and solidarities.

Our Series:

Asif Mian

Non, 2020

Where did you grow up, and how did you end up living where you are now?

I was born in Jersey City, NJ, to Pakistani immigrants. I mostly grew up in Astoria, Queens, and went to high school in a Northern Jersey suburb, which I disliked very much. I moved back to Queens right after college. My family was a sort of loner, Muslim household within American society, so this feeling of placed displacement works for me in the outer boroughs.

What ideas were you thinking about when you were working on this video?

I am interested in behavioral science and the breakdown of personal spaces and how this relates to violence. When making video and performance, I always think about the “body at risk”—what visible/invisible boundaries are made for immigrants and hiding in plain sight, the edges of surveillance, how one’s movements create a volume, and how that volume engulfs targeted individuals. Recently, I have been working on simple science fictions using thermal cameras and cell phone cameras to make videos that react to recent events, creating visual morphs in the fabric of current events.

What issues do you feel the AAPI community will be most impacted by as a result of this election?

There are many targeted bodies under this cloud of systemic violence. It is pervasive and overarching—a mood that seeps into every issue. However, overt actions towards immigrants like the Muslim Ban have still been the most intense and impactful for me.

How do you think artists of AAPI descent can have their voices heard, particularly in this moment of increased racism against Asian-Americans?

I've always been a practitioner of subversion by taking the tools and methods that are oppressive or violent or whatever we hate and turning them inside out and back on themselves to make something that is beautiful. Things that repulse me also have some element of attraction, so by subverting them, these repulsions feel powerful and even dangerous. As a South Asian, we have to deal with our invisibility and our nascent existence in the mainstream. Sometimes, I like to remind myself that just by existing and taking up space in the art world, making my work, and working with AAPI artists, is not expected and a step towards subversion in itself.

Working at the intersection of sculpture, video, and performance, Asif Mian's practice explores the roles that social behavior, power, and violence have in society. Mian's work has been exhibited most recently at Queens Museum, BRIC, The Shed, and The Kitchen.
http://www.asifmian.com
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Naomi
Yoshida
of
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Nell
Herbert
of
Thacher Gallery, University of San Francisco
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Nemo
Xu
of
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New-York Historical Society
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Nicole
Russo
of
Chapter NY
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Nikita
Gale
of
Natural History Museum LA, GREX, Commonwealth & Council, Reyes Finn, 56 Henry
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Océane
Francioli
of
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Oliver
Newton
of
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Patricia
Rogan
of
New York Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital
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Patrick
Staff
of
Commonwealth & Council
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Paul
Soto
of
Park View/Paul Soto
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Pauli
Ochi
of
Ochi Projects
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Paulina
Vu
of
San José Museum Of Art
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Philip
Martin
of
Philip Martin Gallery
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Photios
Giovanis
of
Callicoon Fine Arts
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Pia
Agrawal
of
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Rachel
Uffner
of
Rachel Uffner Gallery
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ReCheng
Tsang
of
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Rebecca
McGrew
of
Pomona College Museum of Art
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Remina
Greenfield
of
The New School
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Renee
Tajima-Peña
of
#AsianAmPBS, UCLA Asian American Studies
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Rick
Royale
of
Royale Projects
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Rick
Noguchi
of
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Robert
Kett
of
ArtCenter College of Design
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Rory
Padeken
of
San Jose Museum of Art
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Sally
McWilliams
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Portland State University
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Sam
Wilson
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Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery
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Samuel
Hou
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Boon Church, OCM
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San Jose Museum of Art
of
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Blazej
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77 Mulberry
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Various Small Fires
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ArtConverge
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Sarah
Russin
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LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions)
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Sarah
Laursen
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Harvard Art Museums
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Sarita
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UC Santa Barbara
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Ogden
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Shrine Gallery
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Scott Cameron
Weaver
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O-Town House
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Sean
Collins
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Neighboring Systems
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Shannon
Lieberman
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Pacific Northwest College of Art
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Caley Regen
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Regen Projects
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Shinhwa
Koo
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Shirley
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Shoshana
Wayne
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Shoshana Wayne Gallery
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Simon
Castets
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Swiss Institute
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Simone
Levine
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Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago
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Sophie
Lam
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Lower Manhattan Cultural Council
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Stephanie
Huang
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California Institute of the Arts
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Stephanie
Hanor
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Mills College Art Museum
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Steven
Wong
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Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery
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Summer
Guthery
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JOAN
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Susan Sayre
Batton
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San Jose Museum of Art
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Takako
Tanabe
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Ulterior Gallery
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Takuya
Matsuda
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Tanya
Zimbardo
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San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
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Taylor
Vaughn
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Tei
Carpenter
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Agency—Agency
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Mastrobuono
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Tiare
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B4BEL4B Gallery
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Tim
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Blum & Poe
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Valerie
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Vanessa
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Stanford Live
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Vera
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United Scenic Artists 829
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Vi
Phung Smith
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Bridge Projects
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Viet-Nu
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Ovitz Family Collection
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Virginia
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Lowell Ryan Projects
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Viv
Liu
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Vivian
Chui
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Pioneer Works
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Vivian
Li
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Walter
Maciel
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Walter Maciel Gallery
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William
Basquin
of
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Willy
Wheeler
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Xiyin
Tang
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UCLA School of Law
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YK
Hong
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Keep Beyond
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Yayoi
Shionoiri
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Chris Burden Estate
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Yeni
Mao
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Young Joon
Kwak
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Yuanfei
Wang
of
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Yuta
Nakajima
of
Hauser & Wirth
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Zachary
Finkelstein
of
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Zheng
Fang
of
UCSC, Animschool
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RESOURCES >>

HARASSMENT CAN ESCALATE INTO PHYSICAL VIOLENCE.

Learn ways to speak up, intervene as a bystander, report harassment and violence. Find out about other tools and resources.