SDA PRESENTS

StopDiscriminAsian (SDA) is proud to present a series of newly commissioned video works by three artists of AAPI-descent that respond to the upcoming general election: Jesse Chun, WangShui and Asif Mian.  Each Monday beginning Sept 28, a new work will debut accompanied by a brief interview with the artist. SDA asked the artists to address the rise of anti-Asian racism in the age of Trump, as well as the issues they felt were particularly urgent heading into this incredibly consequential election. Immigration, LGBTQ rights, and racial discrimination are just some of the concerns these artists chose to reflect on. These short moving-image works adopt the length of a traditional TV commercial, using the tools of mass-media circulation that profoundly impact political thought and engagement.

As the fastest-growing demographic of eligible voters compared to all other major races and ethnicities, Asian Americans have a major role to play in this nation’s political future.  While traditionally marked by low turnout, AAPI voters have made significant gains in recent years, jumping from 28% in 2014 to 42% in 2018. This leap in voter participation presents an opportunity for Asian Americans to engage more deeply in the political process, and to mobilize our communities towards generational change. We hope the individualized responses presented in these videos can bridge the disparate identities that make up the AAPI population by speaking to common concerns that impact all of us, while at the same time maintaining the distinctness of our many voices.  We also recognize that these critical issues demand commitments to action beyond November’s elections, and require mass movements and solidarities.

Our Series:

Asif Mian

Non, 2020

Where did you grow up, and how did you end up living where you are now?

I was born in Jersey City, NJ, to Pakistani immigrants. I mostly grew up in Astoria, Queens, and went to high school in a Northern Jersey suburb, which I disliked very much. I moved back to Queens right after college. My family was a sort of loner, Muslim household within American society, so this feeling of placed displacement works for me in the outer boroughs.

What ideas were you thinking about when you were working on this video?

I am interested in behavioral science and the breakdown of personal spaces and how this relates to violence. When making video and performance, I always think about the “body at risk”—what visible/invisible boundaries are made for immigrants and hiding in plain sight, the edges of surveillance, how one’s movements create a volume, and how that volume engulfs targeted individuals. Recently, I have been working on simple science fictions using thermal cameras and cell phone cameras to make videos that react to recent events, creating visual morphs in the fabric of current events.

What issues do you feel the AAPI community will be most impacted by as a result of this election?

There are many targeted bodies under this cloud of systemic violence. It is pervasive and overarching—a mood that seeps into every issue. However, overt actions towards immigrants like the Muslim Ban have still been the most intense and impactful for me.

How do you think artists of AAPI descent can have their voices heard, particularly in this moment of increased racism against Asian-Americans?

I've always been a practitioner of subversion by taking the tools and methods that are oppressive or violent or whatever we hate and turning them inside out and back on themselves to make something that is beautiful. Things that repulse me also have some element of attraction, so by subverting them, these repulsions feel powerful and even dangerous. As a South Asian, we have to deal with our invisibility and our nascent existence in the mainstream. Sometimes, I like to remind myself that just by existing and taking up space in the art world, making my work, and working with AAPI artists, is not expected and a step towards subversion in itself.

Working at the intersection of sculpture, video, and performance, Asif Mian's practice explores the roles that social behavior, power, and violence have in society. Mian's work has been exhibited most recently at Queens Museum, BRIC, The Shed, and The Kitchen.
http://www.asifmian.com
ALLIES WHO HAVE PLEDGED TO SPEAK UP AGAINST RACIST VIOLENCE AND HARASSMENT.
CLICK HERE TO ADD YOURSELF TO THE LIST.
Aaron
Gach
of
Center for Tactical Magic
.
Aileen
Painter Kim
of
GYOPO
.
Aimee
Friberg
of
CULT Aimee Friberg Exhibitions
.
Aleesa
Alexander
of
Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University
.
Alex
Ahn
of
AA|LA Gallery
.
Alexis
Sarah
of
.
Alison
O'Daniel
of
Commonwealth and Council, California College of the Arts
.
Alma
Rodriguez
of
Blessed Sacrament Catholic Academy
.
Amelia
Kahl
of
.
Amitis
Motevalli
of
.
Ana
Saygi
of
/ (slash)
.
Andrea
Cashman
of
David Zwirner Gallery
.
Anicka
Yi
of
.
Anissa
Paulsen
of
BC Arts Council
.
Annabel
Turrado
of
.
Anne
Ellegood
of
Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (ICA LA)
.
Anthony
Salvador
of
.
Anton
Stuebner
of
Catharine Clark Gallery
.
Aruna
D'Souza
of
.
Ashlea
Scicluna
of
.
Ashlyn
Chak
of
.
Astria
Suparak
of
.
Asuka
Hisa
of
Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (ICA LA)
.
Beatrice
Shen
of
Kayne Griffin Corcoran
.
Ben
Thornborough
of
Regen Projects
.
Ben
Florencio
of
.
Benjamin
Setiawan
of
Hungry Editor
.
Betty
Avila
of
Self Help Graphics & Art
.
Brett
Kashmere
of
UC Santa Cruz
.
Brian
Butler
of
1301PE
.
Brian
Faucette
of
Night Gallery
.
Bridget
Donahue
of
Bridget Donahue gallery
.
Brittany
Ficken
of
Art+Action
.
Byron
Au Yong
of
Activist Songbook
.
Caitlin Meehye
Beach
of
Fordham University
.
Caius
Chew
of
Rhode Island School of Design
.
Cara
Lewis
of
Bridge Projects
.
Carol
Eliel
of
LACMA, AAMC
.
Cat
Yang
of
amwa, GYOPO
.
Catharine
Clark
of
Catharine Clark Gallery
.
Catherine
Sun
of
Art Start
.
Chaio-chung
Chen
of
NYC Community Board & NYC H+H Advisory Board
.
Charlie
James
of
Charlie James Gallery
.
Charlie
Schlinkert
of
.
Charlotte
D'Evelyn
of
.
Chris
Grunder
of
Bass & Reiner Gallery
.
Christina
Linden
of
California College of the Arts, Art Practical
.
Christina
Salas
of
.
Christina Yuna
Ko
of
.
Christine
Kang
of
.
Christine Y.
Kim
of
LACMA, GYOPO
.
Christopher
Schwartz
of
The Gallery @
.
Christopher
Jee
of
.
Christopher
Yin
of
.
Christopher Y.
Lew
of
.
Chul R
Kim
of
Stanford University
.
Claudia
Schmuckli
of
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
.
Clay
Flynn
of
Andrew Edlin Gallery
.
Clea
Massiani
of
Bass & Reiner, Creativity Explored
.
Cole
Lu
of
.
Conrad
Meyers
of
Aggregate Space Gallery
.
Corrie
Siegel
of
Actual Size
.
Craig
Baldwin
of
Other Cinema
.
Crystal
Chen
of
The New York Public Library
.
Dan S.
Wang
of
.
Dana
Kerdesky
of
.
David
Dempewolf
of
.
David
Yun
of
Wax Studios
.
David
Halsell
of
RealMoreReal
.
Dawn
Weleski
of
Colgate University
.
Deb
Klowden Mann
of
Klowden Mann
.
Dena
Beard
of
The Lab
.
Denise
Jones
of
Brass Ring Company & Carpe Diem Arts
.
Diana
Freundl
of
.
Diane
Rosenstein
of
Diane Rosenstein Gallery
.
Donna
Chu
of
DC Projects
.
Drew
Sawyer
of
Brooklyn Museum
.
Eduardo
Mendez
of
Brick x Brick
.
Edward
Gui
of
NanHai Art
.
Eleanor
Chung
of
Mckinneyssa
.
Elizabeth
Lamb
of
Company Gallery
.
Ellie
Lee
of
Equitable Vitrines, GYOPO
.
Ellis
Gallagher
of
17 Frost Gallery
.
Emilia
Yin
of
Make Room Los Angeles
.
Emily
Zhang
of
.
Emily
Kuhlmann
of
Museum of the African Diaspora
.
Erin
Shigaki
of
Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee
.
Estelle
Jue-Clay
of
.
Eugene
Kim
of
.
Eungie
Joo
of
.
Eve
Aschheim
of
Princeton University
.
Flora
Hanitijo
of
Hello, Thank you LLC
.
Francis
Cullado
of
Visual Communications Media
.
Francois
Ghebaly
of
Francois Ghebaly Gallery
.
Gabriel
Ritter
of
.
Gabrielle
Giattino
of
Bureau LLC
.
Gerard
O'Brien
of
the Landing Gallery
.
Gia
Kuan
of
Gia Kuan Consulting
.
Gisela
Morales
of
Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (ICA LA)
.
Glori
Simmons
of
Thacher Gallery, University of San Francisco
.
RESOURCES >>

HARASSMENT CAN ESCALATE INTO PHYSICAL VIOLENCE.

Learn ways to speak up, intervene as a bystander, report harassment and violence. Find out about other tools and resources.